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Linux Support for SmartCards/Flash Cards

Flash / Smart Card Readers

This survey will be merged with the PCMCIA card survey soon.

Survey (sorted by manufacturer)

Model Card
Type
Linux Status(x86)/Driver (Module) 1) Output of 'cardctl ident' Contributor/ Source
Com1 - ComOne
MobiFlash Card flash card *Should* be compatible with Linux by using a "PCMCIA / Compact Flash" adapter. Not tested yet. Com1 White Papers
Epson
EPSON 750Z flashcard "I recently bought an EPSON 750Z digital camera. It uses FlashCards to save the pictures. It was no problem to mount the FlashCard under LINUX. All you need is the adapter to make a PCMCIA card out of the FlashCard (The adapter costs approx. $12 US), a directory /flash and the following entry in /etc/fstab:"
/dev/hda1 /flash msdos defaults
Tilo Sloboda [archived link]
GemPlus
GPR400/GemPC400 smart card reader GEMPLUS, Linux driver by Joe Phillips (Innovation Software Group, LLC).   own research
IBM
Smart Card Security Kit smart card detected as PCMCIA card Gemplus GPR400 aka. GemPC400, see GEMPLUS, Linux driver by Joe Phillips (Innovation Software Group, LLC).
product info: "GEMPLUS", "GPR400", "V1.1"
manfid: 0x0157, 0x3004
function: 0 (multifunction)
own research
Kodak
Picture Card media card unknown, fits into a PCMCIA slot own research
Olympus
SmartCard smart card "behaves like an IDE drive" Sven Geggus
<geg_at_iitb.fhg.de>
OmniKey
CardMan 4040 smartcard reader (PCMCIA)   FSFE

Annotations

  •   If not otherwise stated the Linux status is concerning x86 machines. I'm very much interested to get more reports of Smart Card devices used with non Intel based hardware.


FlashCards

There are adapters available to put them into PCMCIA slots (app. $12 US, for instance a RealVision or Sandisk smartmedia PCMCIA adapter) You may use them by mounting with this line in /etc/fstab:

/dev/hde1       /pics   vfat    user,exec,dev,suid,noauto 1 1

"The Linux Memory Technology Device project resembles a unified subsystem for handling RAM and Flash cards (Memory Technology Devices). It is intended to be compatible with the Linux PCMCIA code, to prevent duplication of code and effort, yet its main target is small embedded systems, so it will be possible to compile the drivers into the kernel for use as a root filesystem, and a close eye will be kept on the memory footprint. Support for FTL exists, and someone is apparently working on the Microsoft Flash Filing System. It also supports direct access to the device via either a character or block device interface."

Laptops with SmartCard Readers

An example from the output of cardctl ident for a ACER TravelMate 351TEV:

product info: "O2Micro", "SmartCardBus Reader", "V1.0"
manfid: 0xffff, 0x0001

Linux installation reports for laptops with in-built SmartCard-Readers:

ACER TravelMate 351TEVDebian Woody 
ACER TravelMate 351TEV [archived link]RedHat 6.2 
ACER TravelMate 352TEVRedHat 7.0 
ACER TravelMate 361EViDebian 3.0 Woody 
ACER TravelMate 660  NEW  Linux 
ACER TravelMate 6003LCiGentoo 
DELL Latitude D820Ubuntu Dapper Drake 
Fujitsu-Siemens Lifebook E-8110  NEW  Debian 4.0 Etch 
Fujitsu-Siemens Lifebook E-8210  NEW  Linux 
HP/COMPAQ NC6400KUbuntu Edgy 
HP/COMPAQ NC6400Debian 
HP/COMPAQ NC8430Novell/SuSE 10.1, Ubuntu 6.06 
HP/COMPAQ NW8440Fedora Core 5 
HP/COMPAQ NX9420Gentoo 
HP/COMPAQ NX9420 [archived link]GentooGerman
Siemens Scenic Mobile 800AGP [archived link]Novell/SuSE 6.4 

Resources

Applications

  • OpenSC consists of a SmartCard library that uses PC/SC Lite as its backend and applications that use the library. It has been tested extensively on Finnish Electronic Identity (FINEID) cards, but it should also work on other PKCS #15 and ISO 7816 compatible SmartCards such as the Swedish Posten eID card. Also implemented are a PKCS #11 module (e.g. for WWW authentication), a PAM module, somewhat working OpenSSH support, a few basic tools, and a PKCS #15 structure generation tool.
  • M.U.S.C.L.E. - Linux Support for SmartCards.
  • CT-API [archived link]
  • Linux Memory Technology Device Project.
  • iX 01/2000 p. 58 ff. Fünf Entwicklungsumgebungen für SmartCards (in German).
  • JavaCard
  • iX 12/2000 p. 152 ff. Chip, Chip, Hurra (in German).
  • Gemplus GemXpresso.
  • Towitoko Smartcard Drivers. "Smartcard technology is becoming a basic keystone of the modern information age. Towitoko produces one of the best low-cost smartcard terminals available for PCs. This package supports I2C memory cards and will include a CT-API for T=0 and T=1 later." Ports for Linux and FreeBSD.
  • pam_cryptocard is a PAM module that authenticates a user using challenge-response. The only token supported is the RB1 from Cryptocard, but all tokens that calculate things the same way should work. The module has been tested with PAM 0.66. Other versions should also work. It currently lacks good documentation.
  • Schlumberger Reflex60 This package is a pure Java OpenCard Framework (OCF) driver for the Schlumberger Reflex60 smart card terminal. It has been tested with OCF 1.1.1. At present, only the RS-232 version of the Reflex60 is supported.
  • JFlash is a Java flash card organizer that enables you to create and review electronic flash cards. The collection of flash cards is stored in XML format so the files are extremely portable. JFlash supports loading a file through a URL using an http connection.
  • lxtimeclock is a very easy to use, extensible timecard program which can be used for managing employee work times. Currently using a Newt based interface, this program is accessible from the console, an xterm, telnet, and dumb terminals.
  • Smartcard is a utility for controlling smart cards. It can read and write memory cards using the standard input and output channels. This should make it useful for all kinds of automated tasks.
  • GNOME Smart Card is a frontend for the program smartcard. With it, you can easily handle smartcards under Gnome.
  • scas [archived link] is a PAM module allowing you to authenticate using smartcards.
  • Smartcard is a utility for controlling smart cards. It can read and write memory cards using the standard input and output channels. This should make it useful for all kinds of automated tasks.
  • ssh-smart is a basic proof-of-concept implementation of ssh authentication via smartcard. The smartcard which is used to store the ssh identity is a memory card (I2C 16KBIT/2048 bytes). ssh-smart uses multiple Perl scripts and the smartcard program to establish communication with the reader and the memory card.
  • SmartSign is a set of modules which allow integration of smartcard technology into an OpenCA based Public Key Infrastructure in order to provide smartcard-based digital signature and local authentication security services. Currently only Cyberflex is supported. It allows direct signing of e-mail and e-news from within Netscape using smartcards and supports signing of generic files from command line. The package includes a PAM module too, which allows system administrators to integrate smartcard-based authentication for local users. Finally, a command line interactive shell supports all operations on the card, and can be used to automate some tasks on the card.
  • GNU Passwords on Cards - POC is a program for managing passwords on smartcards. Each password is stored together with a description on the card. All data on the card is stored encrypted so others won't be able to get your passwords by reading the card. POC encrypts using Blowfish or Rijndael (AES) with a 192 or 256 bit key (depending on the security level selected by the user). Other algorithms can be added easily.
  • Card Terminal Driver Library aims to add support for smart card and magnetic stripe card terminals, such as the IBM 4779, to Linux, and other Posix compatible systems.
  • GNU POC is a program for managing passwords on smartcards. Each password is stored together with a description on the card. All data on the card is stored encrypted so others won't be able to get your passwords by reading the card. POC encrypts using Blowfish or Rijndael (AES) with a 192 or 256 bit key (depending on the security level selected by the user). Other algorithms can be added easily.
  • German Medical Card Reader [archived link] reads the contents of smartcards with any card terminal that supports the CTAPI (for example, any Tokowito chip drives) (in German).
  • libchipcard allows easy access to chipcards via chip card terminals/readers. It uses the CTAPI library provided by the manufacturer of the reader. Towitoko and KOBIL readers are supported. Other devices supported by Linux should also work.
  • ssmart is a little Perl script to store a secure shell identity/cfs passwords blowfish-encrypted to a smartcard. There will be no local copy of your identity on your harddrive, or even worse on an NFS share. It also allows you to quick mount all stored cfs directories, and it can output a little GTK window (useful if you want it to use it with your .xinitrc). It uses the smartcard program to interact with the chipdrive and it is a kind of derivative of ssh-smart.
  • Smart Card ToolKit provides a library and associated tools for smart cards. Phoenix and Smartmouse protocols are supported for ISO7816 asynchronous smart card access, using a simple shell. JDM is supported for programming PIC-based smart cards like piccard, goldwafer (goldcard), and silvercard. All tools use Intel hex file format to store data. An Intel hex to binary and vice-versa converting tool is also provided.

HOWTOs

Credits

  • Beat Rupp <beat.rupp_at_gmx.net>







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© Werner Heuser 1997-2014 · http://tuxmobil.org/smart_linux.html · last change Fri Sep 13 2013